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UK Gov’t Concedes Policies Re: Intel Agencies Snooping on Lawyer/Client Communications Unlawful, Breached ECHR

In Archive, Belhaj, Gaddafi, GCHQ, IPT, Libya, MI5, MI6, Surveillance, UK on February 22, 2015 at 4:25 AM

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02/18/2015

Reprieve:

The UK Government has today conceded that its policies governing the ability of intelligence agencies to spy on lawyer-client communications were unlawful, in response to a case brought by two victims of an MI6-orchestrated ‘rendition’ operation.

Abdul-hakim Belhaj and Fatima Boudchar were tortured and rendered to Libya in 2004 in a joint MI6-CIA operation. They filed a case in 2013 with the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) concerning alleged eavesdropping by UK intelligence services on their confidential communications with their lawyers.

In 2012, the Belhaj family had brought a separate, civil case against the UK Government over the part it played in their mistreatment.   The IPT case centered around whether Government lawyers and officials involved in the civil case could have, through surveillance, gained access to confidential communications between the family and their lawyers, thereby giving the Government an unfair advantage.

Today, the Government has conceded that safeguards to prevent this from taking place were inadequate, and did not meet the requirements of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). However, the Government has yet to say whether or not these failings of policy specifically affected the Belhaj case, which is due to see a further hearing in the IPT on 10th March.

Cori Crider, a director at Reprieve and one of Mr Belhaj & Ms Boudchar’s lawyers said: “By allowing the intelligence agencies free rein to spy on communications between lawyers and their clients, the Government has endangered the fundamental British right to a fair trial. Reprieve has been warning for months that the security services’ policies on lawyer-client snooping have been full of loopholes big enough to drive a bus through.

“For too long, the security services have been allowed to snoop on those bringing cases against them when they speak to their lawyers. In doing so, they have violated a right that is centuries old in British common law. Today they have finally admitted they have been acting unlawfully for years.

“Worryingly, it looks very much like they have collected the private lawyer-client communications of two victims of rendition and torture, and possibly misused them. While the government says there was no ‘deliberate’ collection of material, it’s abundantly clear that private material was collected and may well have been passed on to lawyers or ministers involved in the civil case brought by Abdul-hakim Belhaj and Fatima Boudchar, who were ‘rendered’ to Libya in 2004 by British intelligence.

“Only time will tell how badly their case was tainted. But right now, the Government needs urgently to investigate how things went wrong and come clean about what it is doing to repair the damage.”

Alan Travis/Owen Bowcott/Guardian:

Government sources, in line with all such cases, refuse to confirm or deny whether the two Libyans were the subject of an interception operation. They insist the concession does not concern the allegation that actual interception took place and say it will be for the investigatory powers tribunal hearing to determine the issue.

An updated draft interception code of practice spelling out the the rules for the first time was quietly published at the same time as the Investigatory Powers Tribunal ruling against GCHQ earlier this month in the case brought by Privacy International and Liberty.

The government spokesman said the draft code set out enhanced safeguards and provided more detail than previously on the protections that had to be applied in the security agencies handling of legally privileged communications.

The draft code makes clear that warrants for snooping on legally privileged conversations, emails and other communications between suspects and their lawyers can be granted if there are exceptional and compelling circumstances. They have to however ensure that they are not available to lawyers or policy officials who are conducting legal cases against those suspects.

Exchanges between lawyers and their clients enjoy a special protected status under UK law. Following exposure of widespread monitoring by the US whistleblower Edward Snowden in 2013, Belhaj’s lawyers feared that their exchanges with their clients could have been compromised by GCHQ’s interception of phone conversations and emails.

To demonstrate that its policies satisfy legal safeguards, MI6 were required in advance of Wednesday’s concession to disclose internal guidance on how intelligence staff should deal with material protected by legal professional privilege.

The MI6 papers noted: “Undertaking interception in such circumstances would be extremely rare and would require strong justification and robust safeguards. It is essential that such intercepted material is not acquired or used for the purpose of conferring an unfair or improper advantage on SIS or HMG [Her Majesty’s government] in any such litigation, legal proceedings or criminal investigation.”

The internal documents also refer to a visit by the interception commissioner, Sir Anthony May, last summer to examine interception warrants, where it was discovered that regulations were not being observed. “In relation to one of the warrants,” the document explained, “the commissioner identified a number of concerns with regard to the handling of [legal professional privilege] material”.

Amnesty UK’s legal programme director, Rachel Logan, said: “We are talking about nothing less than the violation of a fundamental principle of the rule of law – that communications between a lawyer and their client must be confidential.

“The government has been caught red-handed. The security agencies have been illegally intercepting privileged material and are continuing to do so – this could mean they’ve been spying on the very people challenging them in court.

“This is the second time in as many weeks that government spies have been rumbled breaking the law.”

  1. […] UK Gov’t Concedes Policies Re: Intel Agencies Snooping on Lawyer/Client Communications Unlawful, B…. […]

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  2. […] the first ruling expected next month the IPT will rule on whether the intelligence services have routinely intercepted legally privileged communications in sensitive security cases without adequate…. The case involves two Libyans, Abdel-Hakim Belhaj and Sami al-Saadi and their families after they […]

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  3. […] UPDATE 02/18/2015 UK Gov’t Concedes Policies Re: Intel Agencies Snooping on Lawyer/Client Communications Unlawful, B… […]

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