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Chilling Effects: NSA Surveillance Drives 1 in 6 U.S. Writers to Self-Censor – PEN Survey

In Archive, Big Brother, Censorship, NSA, Police State, Surveillance on November 23, 2013 at 10:57 PM

11/11/2013

PEN America:

In the human rights and free expression communities, it is a widely shared assumption that the explosive growth and proliferating uses of surveillance technologies must be harmful—to intellectual freedom, to creativity, and to social discourse. But how exactly do we know, and how can we demonstrate, that pervasive surveillance is harming freedom of expression and creative freedom? 

In October 2013, PEN partnered with independent researchers at the FDR Group to conduct a survey of over 520 American writers to better understand the specific ways in which awareness of far-reaching surveillance programs influences writers’ thinking, research, and writing. The results of this survey—the beginning of a broader investigation into the harms of surveillance—substantiate PEN’s concerns: writers are not only overwhelmingly worried about government surveillance, but are engaging in self-censorship as a result

Related Link: They’re Watching Us: So What? Assessing Dangers of New Surveillance Powers w/ Greenwald, Bamford, Schneier & Dorfman

  1. […] Related Link: (SURVEY) Chilling Effects: NSA Surveillance Drives 1 in 6 U.S. Writers to Self-Censor […]

  2. NSA surveillance can be bypassed if you have the proper Internet knowledge. I have created an eBook which teaches the users how to protect themselves from the NSA surveillance. You can check the eBook page here http://www.gofundme.com/yeswescan

  3. The NSA is partnering with state and local police implanting innocent citizens with biochips to enable Uberveillance – thought monitoring. Do people really believe that suddenly we have a rash of mental health issues. I have a biochip implanted in my upper right buttock that you can see, and feel it protruding. Don’t call me a mental patient, I’m not. Since the NSA has elicited the help of state and local police, there are a number of commenters that are here to call people names and keep the truth from coming out until everyone is implanted with one. You’ll never understand the pain and suffering until it happens to you. To never have a private moment again is beyond what people want to believe. If you go to some of the universities, they are doing a lot of the research. The truth is, the biochip is a human carcinogen. Radio signals transfer into electrical signals. This acts as a wireless taser when in your body allowing torture. In addition, they use technology like the audio spotlight by Holosonics to beam sound into your head that those around cannot hear. All the technology is commercially available and can be purchased by anyone. Don’t have a closed mind and don’t think it can’t happen to you. I have been a Christian for 43 years and I have never in my life committed a crime. Besides, the doctors have admitted it to me – you can see and feel it. It’s not rocket science. So the next cop that feels the need to misidentify themselves and call me names, the joke is on you. When enough people are implanted, you will be too! If not, it’s discrimination. Also, the mental health professionals are raking in the money getting paid big bucks to classify people as mental health cases. Before you call names, do some research. Then give an informed opinion. See A Note on Uberveillance by MD Michael or Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence Law & Technology by Springer or Mental Health and Terrorism by Amin Gadit. Go to forbes.com and search Brandon Raub.

  4. […] The first is the chilling effect, which is well-understood. Study after study has show that human behavior changes when we know we’re being watched. Under observation, we act less free, which means we effectively *are* less free. ((SURVEY) Chilling Effects: NSA Surveillance Drives 1 in 6 U.S. Writers to Self-Censor) […]

  5. […] Chilling Effects: NSA Surveillance Drives 1 in 6 U.S. Writers to Self-Censor – PEN Survey […]

  6. […] investigations are at a record high and national security journalists now often work under a shadow of surveillance. By knowing the stakes and how to respond to them, reporters can assess the risks, […]

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